Getting messy

In the last assignment that we got in the Be-still-52 course, Kim asked us to get messy… The idea was to use whatever we found appropriate to create a scene that doesn’t look neat but makes an interesting image and take a top-down photo. I had some plants at home that I needed to replant and decided to shoot the replanting which I supposed would be messy enough. Yeah, it was…

succulent-still-life

The first plant is a succulent that was very small when I bought it but it grows really fast. I thought I would separate the offshoots but the root system was not easy to divide so eventually I ended up with just two plants and bigger pots.

The bulb below is of a hyacinth that I bought before Christmas. I replanted it from the minuscule flowerpot I bought it in to give it better chance of surviving and I’m going to plant it into the garden in spring.

hyacinth-still-life

The following photo has a different perspective, it was not shot top down, but I wanted to add it here. Nobody can deny its messy condition, right?

hyacinth-still-life

The thing is that a good messy image is not just messy but tells a story which is the reason why it’s not that easy to create such an image. Hopefully, you can read something in these images of mine.

In my next post, I’m going to look back at the year and evaluate my participation in the “Be still 52” course. Stay tuned…

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16 Comments

  1. Petra, I love your mess! We rarely photograph a messy scene – we usually want perfection. I think getting dirty with our hands and photos is a real learning experience. Don't you love the white roots on the bulbs? As you saw, I'm growing mine in water – not dirty!

    1. Barb, thank you so much. You’re right, we usually seek the perfection and forget that beauty is omnipresent. I love the roots on the bulbs and I loved those I saw in your photos, I definitely need to try that method out.

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