Bečov nad Teplou

This time I’ll take you to Bečov nad Teplou, a town whose name I’d translate for you as Bečov upon Teplá. We found out that there is a castle we hadn’t known about and went to see it. When we came to the town, I was surprised by its atmosphere, it looked good. Deep woods, a picturesque castle, pieces of metal plastic art displayed in the streets and reminding blacksmith symposiums having taken place during previous years.

While we were passing by the first houses, we saw the following flower which immediately caught my attention. Later I was trying to identify it with the help of on-line field guides but I didn’t find any one resembling it. Don’t you happen to know its name? It was about 1 metre high.

becov-9

Before exploring the castle’s courtyard and garden, we decided to follow a 1 kilometre long educational trail heading for the “Gallows Hill”. In the end of this trail you come to a place where remnants of gallows base can be seen and you can read about dealing with capital crimes in the past on boards presented along the way. Quite dark thoughts, aren’t they but I’ve seen a few interesting details along the way.

For example this metal plate portraying archangel Michael on railings in front of an old church:

Bečov-nad-Teplou

It’s somewhat lost and not very prominent but I really like it. As you can see, the German word “Erzengel” is used instead of the Czech “archanděl”, it says something about the history of the town.

Or this corner in the back of that church:

Bečov-nad-Teplou

I feel attracted by such desolated places and see beauty in them.

When we ascended significant part of the hill, we could admire varied green shades and shapes of the scenery:

Bečov-nad-Teplou

Refreshing, aren’t they? And in the last picture you can see the castle in the right upper corner as well as towers of that old church as they could be seen from the distance.

Bečov-nad-Teplou

Next time I’ll pay attention to the castle itself.

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14 Comments

    1. Sarah, I’ve been enchanted by the flower. Simple but yet stunning. As for the architecture, again and again I discover such a great variety of it in the most unexpected places. It seems to me that people used to play with the look of buildings in a different way than nowadays. Decorating reliefs and carvings are out of date, instead shapes and colours are in the spotlight.

  1. I love that you share with me places that I will most likely never see in person. I don’t know what the flower is, but I don’t have to know its name to appreciate its beauty. The last picture, with the castle and church visible through the trees is just lovely.

    1. Linda, thanks. (Un)fortunately we have just one life and can’t visit every place we’d like… so I think that’s great about blogging that we can share pictures and thoughts of places we visit in a way we perceive them and they aren’t just anonymous, they are connected with our personalities. Moreover, I can often see how different photos I and my husband take in one spot, the way we perceive the places varies significantly from one person to another. It’s enriching to see the other perception…

  2. I love the old stone and iron work of the church. That flower I have no clue, the flower reminds me of a dandelion, but the stem and leaves are very different. Its lovely as are all the photos in this post!!

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